My Mouth Is A Volcano!

Processed with Rookie CamI finally read My Mouth Is A Volcano! and now I know why this book is so popular with teachers! Written by Julia Cook and illustrated by Carrie Hartman, this book tackles the problem of interrupting in a very silly and entertaining way. This is the story of a boy named Louis. Louis sometimes gets very excited when he wants to tell people things. But the problem is that when those exciting things pop into his head, they wiggle and jiggle until they erupt out of his mouth. People get frustrated with Louis, but it isn’t his fault, he just has a volcano for a mouth. He doesn’t think he should get in trouble for interrupting. After all, volcanos erupt and since he has a volcano for a mouth, he doesn’t think he should be in trouble. One day, Louis is very excited to share with his class, but they keep interrupting in the middle of his stories. He goes home frustrated with the “rude” kids that wouldn’t let him finish his stories. He doesn’t like how it feels when people interrupt him. When his mother points out that they may have volcanoes too, he realizes why people get so upset at him. I didn’t love that the adults in the book think the best way to handle an interrupting child is to punish them and send them away, but it’s the reality in a lot of settings. But punishing his outbursts didn’t solve anything just makes Louis feel frustrated and misunderstood. Louis doesn’t work to change until he empathizes with others and realizes how his actions were impacting other people and is then given the tools to help him control himself. Luckily, at the end of the story, his mother takes the time to help Louis understand how to control his volcano and learn not to erupt every time he has something to say. Told from the first person, this story has a good lesson wrapped in a fun and hilarious wrapper. My favorite part was reading out loud in my silly and over the top “Louis voice”!

My Mouth Is A Volcano 2

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